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Assessment of Municipal Urban and Community Programs in the United States and Evaluation of Associated Community Capacity

2013 | Dr. Richard Hauer, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point This project will assess municipal urban forest programs for the capacity to manage urban forest populations. It has been 20 years since the last assessment of municipal urban forestry programs in the United States. This will also allow us to identify the trends and changes that have occurred since 1993. (1) We will develop baseline knowledge of municipal urban forestry program capacity. Defining capacity is important for describing the ability to plant and maintain trees and approaches used to access and remove trees that pose high risk for societal injury and damage. (2) The project will identify approaches that lead to urban & community forest capacity building. This part will identify attributes of municipal programs that lead to enhanced urban forestry outcomes. (3) Project results will be used to support Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of the urban forest. LCA is an important and new way to measure what is needed to grow the urban forest from the nursery to the end point at tree removal. Collected data will also support creating an i-Tree urban forest management module. The data would be used to drive a simulation process using real data that describes municipal urban forestry operations.

Categories 2013, Grant Archive, John Z. Duling Grant | Tags: | Posted on March 27, 2014

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Trees are not an amenity that can be neglected when the economy gets tight. This is a way to provide for their care into the future, and to make sure that the safety programs that protect our workforce continue to evolve. I didn’t make this decision [to become a Heritage Oak Society member] because I was asked; I did it because it’s important. We all have a role to play in planning for the future of our trees.

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